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Eddy Morales
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Councilor Eddy Morales was elected to a four-year term for Council Position 2 in November 2018 and sworn into office on January 8, 2019. 

A small business owner and community organizer, Councilor Morales spent the last 18 years working for multiple national organizations dedicated to community change including Morales Public Relations, a business he started six years ago. His work has proven successful and allowed him to collaborate with policy makers from around the country enabling him to give back to the community that has given him so much.

As recipients of public benefits and the support of countless individuals, he and his family witnessed firsthand growing up how a little assistance can change the entire direction of one’s life and break the cycle of poverty. From grassroots activism to board service, he has kept the needs of local communities close at heart, advocating for vulnerable communities to gain access to healthcare, immigration reform, housing equity, education and ending gun violence. Since 2003 he has raised over $60 million in support of these efforts.

Public benefits also afforded Councilor Morales the opportunity to attend the University of Oregon where he studied Spanish and Planning, Public Policy and Management. He represented his fellow students in leadership and during these formative years decided to dedicate himself to advancing the quality of life for all individuals through civic engagement and public policy.

“My vision for Gresham includes prosperity and opportunity for everyone who lives here. I want to bring my experience, skills, determination and compassion to the Gresham City Council to help tackle issues like housing, transportation, economic growth and education.”

Recognizing that Gresham is one of Oregon’s fastest growing cities, Councilor Morales understands that Council must work proactively together to preserve what we all value about our community. Though Gresham is working well at serving a number of citizens, he noted we have a poverty rate of 20%, which is well above Oregon’s average, sadly leaving many of our neighbors out of economic opportunities.
 
Councilor Morales currently shares a multi-generational home with his partner, Hugh, mother in-law, Rochelle, and rescue dog, Besitos. In his spare time, he enjoys cooking, baking, gardening and sailing and dedicates himself to volunteerism and public service. He is the founder and co-chair of the University of Oregon Latino Alumni Association, Treasurer of the Democratic Party of Oregon, founder of East County Rising, and serves on the boards of the Community Catalyst Action Fund, Midwest Academy, Oregon Coalition for Common Sense, Battleground Texas, Code for Progress and Justice Matters Press.

Website

Cameron Whitten
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cameron (all pronouns) is a proud queer and black activist who has lived in Portland since 2009. Ze first arrived in Portland as a homeless youth and later became a prominent community advocate, storyteller, and civic entrepreneur. Ze has almost a decade of leadership with nonprofit, civic, and political causes, such as Occupy Portland, Know Your City, and Portland’s Resistance. cameron is founder and principal of multimedia and leadership development business Streams of Resistance LLC, through which he works as a motivational speaker and equity trainer. In 2018, cameron founded and became lead advocate for racial justice nonprofit Brown Hope, which is known for the Reparations Power Hour and Blackstreet Bakery. Whitten currently serves on the board of directors for Reach Community Development and Pioneer Courthouse Square, Inc.

Website

Belinda Carroll
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Belinda Carroll is Co-Founder of the Portland Queer Comedy Festival and Organizer of the Portland Dyke March since 2011. Belinda hosts Smut, a monthly comedy show at Funhouse Lounge. According to NewNowNext.com, she’s one of 8 comedians to watch who are not problematic.

Portland Queer Comedy Festival

Portland Dyke March

Smut at Funhouse Lounge

Belinda on Twitter

Belinda will appear on the October 9th My Real Portland.

Shannon Olive
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Shannon Olive was born and raised in Portland, Oregon. She is 40 years old with two boys (22 and 20) who also live in Portland. After graduating from Concorde Career Institute with her Medical Assistant in 2004 it was very challenging to find a job. Later that year, she was introduced to Oregon Action by Johnnie Gage during the George Bush vs John Kerry 2004 Presidential Election and they were recruiting for their voter registration campaign.

Shannon never voted, but that year discovered that she can too make a difference and was glad to be a part of something different. Shannon was unstoppable, and now had joined the social movement, fighting for our rights, addressing issues then and now that would make Oregon a better place for low-income communities of color. Her first organizer position was with OPAL (Organizing People, Activating Leaders) and Environmental Justice Group in SE Portland. She organized their first Bus Riders Campaign and they informed over 2,000 Bus Riders about the fare increase and budgets cuts.

After her work with OPAL, Shannon returned to Portland Community College to further her education with an Associate Degree in Criminal Justice. While attending school she became an employee working with ASPCC Student Government for two years as the Director of Legislative Affairs. In June 2015, Shannon received her Associate Degree. Shannon has been serving her community since 2004. Now she’s the Founder/President for WomenFirst Transition & Referral Center, working to serve women in re-entry and recovery - supporting them to rebuild their lives to succeed. She will never stop. The fight is in her and she will continue to fight for change until it comes.

www.rebuildwomenfirst.org

On Facebook

Season 2 Episode 2: Nathan Hart, Jo Ann Hardesty, Laura Ivancie
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What a dream this show was! Now, I cut the game show out from the show as my mic was crackly and didn’t sound great. The conversation I had with Jo Ann Hardesty was one of the most amazing evenings of my life. Nathan Hart is fantastic and hilarious - follow him at @starvinghartist everywhere. And Laura Ivancie - what an original gem and the songs she plays at the end of the show complete a super delightful evening. Recorded live at the Jade Lounge at 24th and SE Ankeny on April 14th, 2019.

Nathan Hart

Jo Ann Hardesty

Laura Ivancie

You can download the link below to listen whereever you’d like, or simply visit the homepage www.myrealportland.com for links to the podcast on most popular podcasting platforms/apps.

Next Show April 14! Phenomenal Line Up!!!!
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The next My Real Portland features Comedian Nathan Hart (Harvey’s Comedy, The Hard Times , Earthquake Hurricane), City of Portland Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty (Oregon House of Representatives, US Navy, NAACP Portland Chapter, Albina Ministerial Alliance, KBOO), and Laura Ivancie (Waterfront Blues Festival, International Songwriting Competition, Portland Rose Festival). All that, plus a game show and great German food and beer!

Jade Lounge, 23rd and SE Ankeny, Happy Hour at 5:30, Show starts at 6 PM

Jo Ann Hardesty
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I grew up in Baltimore as one of ten children; my father was a longshoreman and my mother stayed at home with us. I was a pretty nerdy kid. By the time I graduated high school I had read pretty much anything that I wanted to read in our library. I always wanted to learn more and see more. So right out of high school, I joined the Navy, and I loved it. I was stationed in the Philippines, working in the personnel office, and then had the opportunity to be on board ship. In fact, I was one of the first women to go on board ships. I went to so many different places, from Hong Kong to Kenya and everywhere in between. That time really informed my opinion that most people are naturally good people. No matter where in the world I went I would find people who were very good, very helpful, especially to a young woman who thought she knew everything.

After the Navy, I spent a few years in the Bay Area but decided ultimately that I wanted to find somewhere else to settle down as my permanent home. I finally decided on Oregon because it had things I was looking for— the ability to be close to the water and mountains, and a place where I felt like I could really make a difference. I was fortunate that my first job in Oregon was with the Black United Fund. That gave me an opportunity to travel all over the state meeting with little nonprofits who were doing wonderful work. I found a can-do spirit. There were so many people that I worked with who didn’t necessarily have formal training but they saw an ill that was taking place or something that needed to be changed, and they were willing to come together and improve it. That job made me feel like it was a place where I could be with people who were committed to making it better, not just for their family but for everybody’s family.

Later I was able to work for Bev Stein, who was a County Commissioner in Multnomah County. Before Bev, I did not like politicians. I was so fortunate to work for an elected official like her because she was true and consistent to what she said she would do. No matter what part of town she was in or who she was talking to, she cared deeply about what they had to say. She is still the only person that I know who when they bring a group of people together, they’re intentionally of diverse backgrounds and experiences because she wants to hear from everyone. From her, I learned that elected officials didn’t have to know everything. They just had to listen to good people who were interested in making the city better for EVERYONE and use that to make public policy. Working for Bev was directly related to why I ran and served in the Oregon legislature and why I now want to be a member of the Portland City Council.

The day that I decided to run for City Council was a day that many will remember: it was the day that the police contract was renegotiated. I testified at the hearing but was very aware that outside of City Hall–we were surrounded by law enforcement from nearly every branch possible keeping the voices of so many Portlanders outside. I started thinking that the wrong people were in City Hall if the new normal was completely removing discourse other than what the council wanted to hear. I’ve been an advocate for years now and have felt so many times Iike I’m just banging my head against the doors of City Hall, hoping that somehow things will change. I’m running because I want every Portlander to feel like they can be heard at City Hall. We need to take into account voices from every walk of life. We need to find commonality. There’s an opportunity to not be divided by where one lives in the city, by economics, gender, race, sexual orientation or any other way that we can find division, but to be one Portland. That time is now.

Season 2 Episode 1: Shrista Tyree, Barbara Dudley, and Mic Crenshaw
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This episode is the epitome of My Real Portland. Individually they are a comedian, an activist, and a musician. Together, we put together a show that will entertain you, make you want to get up and move, laugh, cry, and sing along.

Learn more about each guest!

Shrista Tyree

Barbara Dudley

Mic Crenshaw

You can download the link below to listen whereever you’d like, or simply visit the homepage www.myrealportland.com for links to the podcast on most popular podcasting platforms/apps.

Mic Crenshaw
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Born on the Southside of Chicago, and raised both there and in Minneapolis, Michael Crenshaw is a world class MC and poet who has emerged on the national - and international stage. As a teen in the late 80's, Mic was embroiled in the violent streets of Minneapolis, leading groups to physically confront white supremacist gangs that were enforcing their will at local parks and social scenes. After beating back the neo-nazis, the violence remained, both in the streets and from authorities. Crenshaw decided it was time to escape it all and moved west to Portland, OR. Crenshaw says, "I wanted something new. [At the time] my ties with the streets were still pretty strong, and my social life involved drinking and fighting. I was ready for a change."

In Portland, he quickly became one of the most respected artists in the Northwest. Beginning in '94, Crenshaw was the front man for the beloved Portland live Hip Hop band, Hungry Mob. In 2001, Crenshaw won The Portland Poetry Slam Championship and went on to finish as a national finalist.

In Portland, Mic's community efforts expanded from the local - to the global. At the close of a Human Rights conference he attended in Rwanda, Crenshaw was confronted by local activists. They said that in America there are computers and they need his help to get them computers. As a result, upon returning to Portland, he enlisted help from an educational colleague, Morgan Delaney. As a result, Globalfam was born.

Globalfam is now a full entertainment company, record label and lifestyle company in one. It houses and produces Crenshaw's music. As well as, partners with the non-profit Education WithOut Borders (EWOB) to manage the community projects that Crensahw and Globalfam are involved in. Crenshaw now serves as EWOB's President. Seven years later, the request for computers has blossomed into a full computer education center in Burundi, Central Africa. Over 800 people have received training, and the center is now expanding, generating revenue and creating jobs by adding a computer repair shop. It is 100% locally managed and staffed. EWOB and Globalfam, along with its supporters, have been the sole outside sponsor

EWOB helps education, music and art initiatives in Portland and their work in Africa, as well serving as an umbrella for the Portland Books For Prisoners Chapter. Crenshaw is currently the Political Director of Hip Hop Congress and the Lead U.S. Organizer for the Afrikan Hip Hop Caravan. The Caravan toured six African cities in 2012 and will tour 10 cities between Cape Town and Cairo in 2014. The Caravan engages each city with a show in the city center, a Hip Hop Symposium and a free show for the youth in a township or ghetto. Crenshaw was invited to be part of the Caravan after playing the Shoko International Festival in Harare Zimbabwe in 2012.

Since 2012, Mic has released 3 EP’s expanding his musical presentation into metal and other rock inspired sound. The EP " Superheros"(2014), which features Dead Prez on its title track solidified Mic's place in Hip Hop worldwide and as an activist/educator. Bionic Metal” (2014) features signature wordplay in line with motivating sonic backdrops . Hope and Danger (2016) heightens the introspection and critical analysis of race, class and culture in modern society. Mic recently released a new project entitled "EarthBound", which explores out modern social condition through the lens of ecological responsibility, economic violence and the sociopathic tendencies of our political landscape.

Mic will be on the March 10th episode of My Real Portland.

Follow Mic at Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and his website.

Barbara Dudley
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Barbara Dudley received her BA in Political Science with honors in Social Thought from Stanford University in 1967, and her JD from the University of California at Berkeley in 1971.  Ms. Dudley was a Lecturer in the UC Berkeley School of Criminology in 1973 and 1974. She practiced law in California with California Rural Legal Assistance and with the Agricultural Labor Relations Board.  

In 1983, she became the President and Executive Director of the National Lawyers Guild headquartered in New York City; from 1987 to 1992 served as Executive Director of a New York based Unitarian Universalist charitable foundation; from 1992 to 1997 was Executive Director of Greenpeace USA; and in 1998 was appointed Assistant Director for Strategic Campaigns of the national AFL‑CIO.  

In 1999, Ms. Dudley moved to Oregon where she has been a partner in a family business, Bethel Heights Vineyard, since 1978. She is also a founder of and Senior Policy Advisor to the Oregon Working Families Party.  She currently serves on the Portland Workers Rights Board as well as the boards of the Oregon Center for Public Policy, Family Forward Oregon, the National Lawyers Guild Foundation.

Ms. Dudley has been an adjunct assistant professor at Portland State since 2000. Ms. Dudley is a Senior Fellow at the Hatfield School’s Center for Public Service.

Barbara will appear on the March 10th My Real Portland.

PSU Hatfield School of Government

Oregon Working Families Party